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GSDCA Schemes

The German Shepherd Dog Association of Western Australia (Inc) is a member of the German Shepherd Dog Council of Australia (GSDCA) (Inc). As such, we have contributed to the development, operation and promotion of those GSDCA Schemes for breed improvement to the German Shepherd Dog as a Breed. Access to these schemes is available in all significant states and territories of Australia.

Those schemes are :

GSDCA Breed Survey Scheme

GSDCA Tattoo Scheme

GSDCA Hip and Elbow Dysplasia Control Scheme

GSDCA Haemophilia Scheme

GSDCA Teeth Certificate Scheme

GSDCA Hereditary Diseases Scheme

GSDCA Judges Extension Course

GSDCA National Show and Main Breed Exhibition

GSDCA National Review Magazine

 

APPLICATION FORMS CAN BE FOUND IN DOWNLOADS COLUMN OR CLICK HERE

 


GSDCA Breed Survey Scheme


 

The Breed Survey Scheme is a nationally accredited scheme run by the German Shepherd Dog Council of Australia. At a minimum age of eighteen months the dog/bitch is presented to a panel of GSDCA Breed Surveyors who assess the animal, not only on its anatomical breed worth, but also on its character and temperament.

During the assessment the dog is gun tested, crowd tested and the dogs reaction to all aspects of the survey observed. Any fault in temperament is an automatic fail no matter how beautiful the animal is.

After assessment that the dog/bitch is above average in anatomical breed worth, providing the dog/bitch has the necessary hereditary diseases criteria and has passed the temperament tests, the animal is classified as suitable for breeding and recommendations made as to a suitable mate.

For animals to enter a GSDCA Breed Survey, the following criteria must be adhered to :

1. Only entries on the official  application form for breed survey GSDCA BS1 will be accepted.
2. The animal must be 18 months of age and not over 8 years of age.
3. The animal must be tattooed in within the GSDCA National Tattoo Scheme or any other Tattoo scheme recognised by the German Shepherd Dog Council of Australia.
4. The animals must be in procession of an ‘A’ stamp for hips and a ‘Z’ stamp for elbows, or passed any other GSDCA approved evaluation scheme for hips and elbows.
5. The relevant paperwork is to be forwarded to the State Registrar prior to the survey date. The paperwork must include the following;-
a. The required fee.
b. ANKC Certified pedigree and certificate of ownership.
c. Copies of the ‘A’ and ‘Z’ stamp results/certificate.
d. Five generation pedigree.
e. A coloured photograph is be submitted on the day of the breed survey, or post / e-mail a photo to the NBC Chairperson within 7 days of the Breed Survey.
f. For all imported animals a copy of the letter received from the National Breed Commission Chairman that details and any titles have been verified.
g All imported males dogs must possess a GSDCA H neg. certificate prior to being submitted to breed survey.
h All male progeny from imported bitches must possess a GSDCA H neg. certificate prior to being submitted to breed survey.
i All relevant original documentation (pedigree, hip and elbow results/certificate etc) is to be brought to the survey and shown to the BREED SURVEYOR.

Please Note: Dogs which are listed on the Limited Registrar can not be accepted for breed survey.

The requirements to receive Breed Survey Class I in the German Shepherd Dog Council of Australia Breed Survey Scheme  are as follows :-

• Anatomically far above the breed average.
• Faultless gapless, healthy dentition Double P1’s allowed.
• Maximum size is 66cms for dogs and 61cms for bitches
• Minimum size is 60cms for dogs and 55cms for bitches.
• Character and temperament must be firm and self assured.
• Must be firm on reaction to the gun test.
• Must be in possession a GSDCA ‘A’ stamp or any other GSDCA recognised scheme for hips.
• Must be in possession of a GSDCA ‘Z’ stamp or any other GSDCA recognised scheme for elbows.
• Imported males and sons of imported dams must have a GSDCA ‘H’ neg certificate.

The requirements to receive Breed Survey Class II in the German Shepherd Dog Council of Australia Breed Survey Scheme are as follows :-

• Are anatomically above the breed average.
• Can have a not quite correct scissor bite.
• Can have a missing only premolar 1 or molar 4.
• Can have missing two only premolar 1’s or one only Premolar 2.
• Can have missing one only Premolar 1 plus one only incisor.
• Slightly level bite, slightly worn teeth. Not due to age.
• Maximum size is 66cms for dogs and 61cms for bitches.
• Minimum size is 60cms for dogs and 55cms for bitches.
• Must be firm or sufficiently firm on reaction to the gun test.
• Character and temperament must be firm and self assured.
• Must be in possession of a GSDCA ‘A’ stamp or any other GSDCA recognised scheme for hips.
• Must be in possession of a GSDCA ‘Z’ stamp or its GSDCA recognised scheme for elbows.
• Imported males and sons of imported dams must have a GSDCA ‘H’ neg certificate.

Animals which cannot fulfil the above described requirements and display any of the following must be denied classification :-

• Are not anatomically above the breed average.
• The measurement recorded is more than 66cms for dogs and 61cms for bitches.
• The measurement recorded is less than 60cms for dogs and 55cms for bitches.
• May have no more missing teeth than the following :
o missing only premolar 1 or molar 4.
o missing two only premolar 1’s or one only Premolar 2.
o missing one only Premolar 1 plus one only incisor.
• Overshot or undershot mouths.
o The condition of an overshot mouth is deemed to occur when the incisors of the upper jaw protrude a distance of two (2)mm or more from the incisors of the lower jaw.
• Soft non-erect ears
• One sided or double sided cryptorchidism or uneven or undeveloped testicles.
• .Long double coat. Long coat without undercoat.
• Fail the gun test.
• Show trepidation, are overly suspicious, apprehensive, wary, visually fearful or are aggressive without provocation.
• Albino characteristics (i.e. lack of pigmentation and with pink noses, near whites or with near white coats, even with black noses, or dark eyes or dark nails).

Any animal that has been deemed to have failed breed survey on two separate occasions for the same reason shall not be eligible to present to breed survey on any future occasion.

The loss of teeth through accident, or mechanical means provided they are attested to by a GSDCA Certificate shall be counted as though they are present and considered as such when making a classification for either class.
No other form of documentation shall be accepted.
(Refer to attached procedure for GSDCA Tooth Certificates).

Verification of Documentation for all Imported Animals Prior to Entry to the GSDCA National Breed Survey Scheme (as at July 2005).

Forward to the National Breed Commission Chairman details of animals imported into Australia.

It is requested that owners of newly imported dogs and bitches provide the Breed Commission Chairman with a copy of pedigree and any relevant information (1996).

Titles / classification to be verified for imported animals include :

• Tattoo number.
• Pass in a GSDCA approved evaluation scheme for hips and elbows.
• Previous breed survey classification in a GSDCA recognised Breed Survey Scheme.

Procedure to follow for imported animals to participate in breed survey (as at July 2005).

Any animal with a recognised imported title/classification as detailed above prior to entry into GSDCA Breed Survey Scheme provide the following documentation to the National Breed Commission Chairman :

1. A title verification form is issued by the National Breed Commission Chairman to the owner of the said animal.
2. The completed title verification form is returned to National Breed Commission Chairman with a copy of the overseas pedigree and a copy of any titles or breed survey classifications.
3. The National Breed Commission Chairman shall verify the required information per the SV Breed Survey Books or Genetics Disc, etc.
4. The National Breed Commission Chairman will notify in writing the owner of the imported animal that the titles have been verified and a copy of the letter included with the application for breed survey.

Should any discrepancy arise then the SV or controlling body is contacted and any additional fees incurred by this Council shall be the responsibility of the owner of the said animal.


GSDCA Tattoo Scheme


All puppies are tattooed at 7-8 weeks of age in the right ear with three letters and three numbers. The letters represent the breeders’ prefix and the numbers represent the individual puppy in order of its litters breeding.

Each tattoo is unique and is used as identification in all of our schemes. An added side benefit is that through the tattoo number and via the breeder a lost animal can be quickly reunited with its owner and no special equipment is required to read a tattoo.

Requirements for Tattoo Identification that is Difficult.

Procedure if a Tattoo is Difficult to Read :

Case 1. If the tattoo is partially visible, but you are unable to read the entire tattoo. The dog is to be tattooed when under anaesthetic for the hip/elbow xray, by a club tattoo officer, not the veterinarian, in the left ear with its original tattoo prefix/number.

Case 2. If the tattoo is not visible at all, then the owner is to apply for an “AUS” number. This is to be applied when the dog is under anaesthetic for the hip/elbow xray, by a club tattoo officer, not the veterinarian, in the right ear.

In both cases, the attending club tattoo officer is to report this to the club’s Tattoo Registrar for GSDCA recording purposes.


GSDCA Hip Dysplasia (HD) and Elbow Dysplasia (ED) Control Scheme
.


GSDCA Hip Dysplasia Scheme

At twelve months or older the dog’s hips are x-rayed and the plates scored and graded, if the animals hips fall into the normal parameters for breeding the dog is given an ‘A’ Stamp.

GSDCA Elbow Dysplasia Scheme

This scheme is similar to the hip scheme, again if the elbows fall within normal parameters, the dog is given a ‘Z’ Stamp.

Both of these assessments are recorded on a single form which is available from the State Hip and Elbow Registrar. To provide background as to how the HD Scheme has developed to this point, the following is an extract of GSDCA NBC records :

Review of the HD Scheme – NBC Meeting August 2000.

At the recent NBC Meeting in Melbourne, the HD Scheme was brought under review. The two radiologists Drs Lavelle and Wyburn were invited to attend the meeting on the Saturday to obtain their comments re the state of the scheme and any changes they considered that could possibly improve the scheme. This was in response to various letters of complaint and general frustrations of some members in trying to understand why dogs with identical scoring were getting different grades.

The various aspects of the HD scheme were discussed at length with the radiologists and on the Sunday, further discussion took place. The meeting then proposed the following motion:-

“That the grading system for the hip scheme be discontinued, and as from 1 April 2001 the ‘A’ stamp be awarded to those animals that  score no more than 8 in any one hip. “(which was Carried unanimously)

All the delegates and members present agreed that this would be the way to go forwards and would remove the majority of the complains and misunderstandings created by using two different systems for determining results. It was decided that a maximum score of 8 in one hip would be accepted without any qualifying restrictions. It was agreed this would remove the subjectivity and the pass rate would be under GSDCA control and could be changed at a later date if ever desired.

General Discussion :

The GSDCA HD Scheme has been running some 20 years and has had several changes to its structure during this time. Initially the hips were just graded, with there being 3 level of pass accepted for the ‘A’ stamp being Normal, Near Normal and Acceptable. At this time the hip results were divided into 4 grades of HD, in reality 5 grades where 0 was a Normal, grade 1 Near Normal and Grade 2 an Acceptable. Grades 3 and 4 were at that time fails.

The system was then expanded to include the BVA method of scoring where nine different points of the hip were being measured and scored from a 0-6 for each point (except a maximum of 5 in one area), to a maximum total of 53 per hip. This was a much more qualitative approach to hip reading and has been well accepted in several countries. The GSDCA then continued with two systems superimposed on each other ie. using both the gradings and the scores to reach a final result.

The result obtained has always been relative to the highest grade of the worst hip. This scheme was slightly expanded to allow a borderline grading of the hips and a general principal of accepting up to as maximum of 8 per hip as an acceptable score allowed for breeding purposes. Within the 8 per hip accepted, there were several ‘qualifiers’ ie. that there is no more than 3 in subluxation, no more than 2 for femoral head and neck combined. These results were then graded with the results and grades being roughly equivalent to Grade 0 = N, Grade 1= NN, Grade 2 = Acc, Grade 3 = Bdl. However some grade 3’s passed and some failed – an area that created discord. Several years ago, the grading system was expanded to the international grading system encompassing 6 grades (and 0 grade =7). This was in order to divide the worse grades of hips into more realistic groupings, so as a result of this, all the Borderline gradings fitted into the new Grade 3. Grade 4 and up were fails.

The vast amount of misunderstanding and angst that arises from hip results is as a result of having two not quite equivalent systems for sorting out the hip results. The grade and the score do not necessarily go hand in hand. The grade is subjective, the score qualitative, so that hips with a score of 0/3 can be graded anywhere from a Normal to Acceptable depending on where the scores come and further, the grading can vary even if the areas scored are identical.

Following the discussions with Drs Lavelle and Wyburn, it was agreed by all (including the radiologists) that the area of grading was the major cause of the queries and/or complaints in regard to the HD/ED Schemes. The view of the AVA Radiologists panel in regards to the grading, was that they are dropping this in favour of scores. Further, the AVA currently only recommends breeding with those animals whose worst hip scores less than ½ the breed average.

In regards to the GSD, Dr Wyburn stated it was up to us to decide the criteria necessary for an acceptable breeding score as more than hips were being looked at.

Historically the GSDCA has always asked that we have as a minimum a 75% pass rate in the HD Scheme. This has been adhered to, and in some years we have been able to get as high as 80-85% pass rate. One must always remember that we are selecting for many factors, not just hips, when we select breeding stock. Temperament, teeth, testicles, elbows and hips all have to be of acceptable levels, and the dog/bitch has to be a good representative of the breed as well ie. still look like a good GSD! The more  factors we select for, the slower the overall rate of progress. While ideally one should breed from the lowest scores possible in HD, however, if one concentrates on this one feature alone to the exclusion of all else, the breed’s overall health and appearance gets forgotten. HD is a polygenetic problem, ie. affected by more than one gene, efforts to move the breed average for HD down in any breed is slow, and takes many years to do so. Problems affected by fewer genes, eg. Elbow dysplasia are easier and more rapidly effective. Ideally in the future we can have a simple DNA test that gives a high degree of certainty as to the final HD (and /or ED) Status of a puppy.

The suggestion to drop the grading system will clear many of the criticisms currently aimed at the HD Scheme. While there are still some variations in the scoring between readers, this variation would be very hard to totally eliminate. The maximum total of an 8 per hip without qualification will again simplify the results and remove the interpretation variation placed by the grading system. A total of 8 in a hip is still low when viewed from a maximum total of 53 per hip that is possible in the worst cases of HD.

The current breed average for GSD’s in Australia from some 10,000 dogs read is around 13.99. The breed average is just that, the average GSD hips read at around a total score of 13, yet despite this we manage to get 75-80% of those submitting with a maximum reading of 8 in any one hip. Technically we allow up to a total score of 16, but in reality this rarely happens for as soon as one hip passes the 7-8 barrier, the fails start to cut in.

To achieve an 8 in one area alone is not possible (maximum of 6 is the highest one can score in any one area), nor is it possible to get such a low score just on points of arthritis without already scoring points on the top 2-3 areas. Equally scoring a 4 in subluxation would not happen without nearly a similar score in the Norberg angle. If the total allowed is an 8, the amount of room left to score points for arthritis and still be able to pass is very small.

The GSDCA HD/ED system has in the past served us very well and the overall incidence of severe HD/ED has dramatically reduced over the years. The Schemes have been altered during the years to reflect the changing needs and developing trends in determining acceptable grading and scoring systems. Where ever there is a cut off point in any scheme, there will be contention, particularly by those that just fail.

Having the dual systems of grading and scoring is creating considerable discontent by the variable results arising between the different systems of evaluation. By dropping the grading system and just using the scoring system, this will greatly simplify the results currently being received. This new system, if adopted, would also result in the ‘A’ stamp being advertised with the score next to it, and in the Breed Survey book, the pass results for hips would appear as a score. With dogs where a hip scores a 7 or 8, it would be advisable that these dogs are breed with care to dogs of low score and/or those that are producing low hip score averages – a mention of which could be placed on the breed survey if needed.

I strongly recommend that the Clubs adopt this motion and thus simplify the ‘A’ stamp result system.

Karen Hedberg BVSc
NBC Chairperson


GSDCA Haemophilia Scheme


Procedures for the GSDCA Haemophilia Scheme testing and issue of the GSDCA H neg Certificate.

At the 2008 GSDCA AGM, a motion was carried to replace the individual State Club Haemophilia Registrars with one National Haemophilia Registrar for the GSDCA Haemophilia Scheme. As from 1st July 2008, the National Haemophilia Registrar has the sole responsibility for the issuing of the all GSDCA testing sheets and all GSDCA Hneg certificates.

To participate in the GSDCA Haemophelia Scheme owners must contact the National Haemophilia Registrar, Dr Karen Hedberg :

The GSDCA Haemophilia Scheme Registrar for the GSDCA (Inc) is :

Dr Karen Hedberg
Phone: 02 4571 2124 – Fax: 02 4571 2451
E-mail: <gsdvetkh@bigpond.com>

This Australia wide scheme applies to imported male dogs and sons of imported females only ! In order for any GSD to be accepted as a stud dog and his progeny be registered by the Canine Association of WA (CAWA) or any Australian National Kennel Council (ANKC) affiliated Kennel Control, the owners must supply :

proof of the dog having been x-rayed for Hip Dysplasia and Elbow Dysplasia, and
the dog must have been tested for Haemophilia, with the owner in possession of an H neg Certificate for that dog.

 

GSDCA Teeth Certificate Scheme


GSDCA Tooth Certificates :

The GSDCA tooth certificate is the only recognised certificate that can be used for Shows and Breed Survey.
No other form of documentation is accepted.

The President or the Breed Affairs Chairman should inform all overseas judges that this is an official certificate and is the only one to be accepted.

The final and only arbitrator and issuer of Certificates shall be the President of the German Shepherd Dog Council of Australia.

The required fee as at 1st September 2005 is $35.00.

For a tooth certificate to be issued the following procedure must be met.

For animals not previously breed surveyed :

1. X-ray proof that a normal, healthy, developed adult tooth existed at a point of time. Certificates will only be issued where a tooth or teeth have been removed or are not visible from above the gum line. The x-ray must be identified radiographically with the dog’s name and GSDCA Tattoo number.
The documentation must be forwarded to the Club Chief Surveyor/Breed Affair Chairman with the required fee.

The onus of proof shall be squarely upon the owner of the dog to prove absolutely beyond all doubt that the said tooth was a normal healthy adult (secondary) tooth.

For animals that have been surveyed :

2. A copy of the Breed Survey Certificate verifying complete dentition must be forwarded to the Club Chief Surveyor/Breed Affairs Chairman with the required fee.

In both sets of circumstances the Club Chief Surveyor/Breed Affairs Chairman must forward all correspondence and x-rays and the required fee to the President of the German Shepherd Dog Council of Australia. A letter of recommendation from the Club Chief Surveyor/Breed Affairs Chairman must also accompany the application.

Please note that an animal with damaged/broken teeth do not require a Tooth Certificate as it is only where the tooth is not visible above the gum line.

The Breed Affairs Chairman is only used when there is no Club Chief Surveyor.


GSDCA Hereditary Diseases Scheme



GSDCA Judges Extension Course



GSDCA National Show and Main Breed Exhibition



GSDCA National Review Magazine


For further specific information, please request same by E-mail to :

Honorary Secretary:
Anna Mitchell
M 0412 420 711
E secretary@gsdawa.org